Reuniting Europe

I really like the title by EurActiv France: “Schengen : la France opportuniste“.

By introducing de facto border controls at its borders with Italy, France created a huge political turmoil. But the bad example is always contagious. When Denmark did something worse, announcing it would re-introduce border controls at all its borders, France appeared as the most shocked. Then Denmark explained that the controls were for merchandise only, the Commission made a proposal and ministers agreed to something not so clear, but which appears as a lesser evil, under the circumstances. Which France said was “more Europe, not less”.

Meaning this is how Europe functions, more or less…

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  1. France should have known and should know that wars go with great sacrifices,and should have considered an immigration outburst before beginning this war.And i completely suport Berlusconi,s idea of sharing the refugee problems with other european nations.The libya war is a european dream and the americans have made that very clear,playing the second fiddle and suportive role has been very wise of the americans.if europe wants to make a change to the polity and structure of the libyan sovereign they should be also prepared to pay the sacrifices that it entails,the americans have paid their dues in many wars fougght across the globe .
    The immigration problems emanating from the libya war is a clear indication that the allies should clearly define and redefine their goal: That goal should not only be protecting civilians it should be removing Gaddafi from ofice, and the more delay in that goal the more refugee problems that France must be ready to cope with.

  2. Dear Angel,
    I have a more simplistic view.
    Mr Sarkozy panics seeing the surge of Marine Le Pen in sight of the 2012 elections, and the whole of Europe is paying the price of his panicking.
    By the way, in my short blogpost I did not develop the idea of nationalism and populism in Denmark, which is pushing the government to do things unacceptable under EU law. Much the same situation.
    No one things strategically, I’m afraid. The only factor is the internal political factor, in which nationalists, populists, extremists, xenophobes, far-right play a greater and greater role.
    And no one in Europe, not the Commission, not the European Parliament in any case, think of how to better communicate with citizens, so that the messages of the populists would not pass across so easily.
    Kind regards,
    Georgi

  3. Good afternoon Georgi,

    to begin with, I want to introduce to you and your readers “Why Europe is on the brink”, which is a very interesting article of the Daily Telegraph that paints the picture of our pathetic EU:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/europe/8514094/Why-Europe-is-on-the-brink.html

    The article is very good, and deals (like your comment) with the nationalists of the EU. It’s a rather pessimistic but realistic article. Nevertheless, the conclusion is optimistic! I quote it:

    And that is no cause for celebration or schadenfreude. Tarnished and flawed though it may be, the EU has made a huge contribution to peace and has supported the democratic aspirations of many millions of people. It urgently needs two things: a strategy to deal with the debt crisis in which no options are ruled out, and a new set of leaders.

    Yes, we urgently need new leaders, as Wolfgang Münchau wrote too through the Financial Times in july 2010:

    http://turkey.blogactiv.eu/2011/02/08/an-excellent-article-written-by-wolfgang-munchau-europe-requires-end-of-merkel-and-sarkozy/

    Secondly, dear Georgi, here in France many media and many people know that Sarkozy wants the far-right to be its opposition at the second ballot.

    Why?

    Because he is sure to win against the far-right at the second ballot. As Chirac won against it many years ago (82% of the votes).

    So Sarkozy doesn’t want the socialist party to reach the second ballot.

    If a man represents the socialists, Sarkozy will lose.

    However, if the candidate of the socialists is a woman and if that woman reaches the second ballot, Sarkozy may win.

    Why?

    Because in France a woman president is not something that is wanted.

    Ségolène Royal lost in 2007 because she was a woman. Quite simply.

    (She also lost because the media (under the pressure of some powerful dark foreign lobbies) made a heavy propaganda for Sarkozy).

    Because in France too people are misogynist. Really.

    But I want to have hope, that’s why I support Martine Aubry.

    She would be an excellent president. She is very intelligent, very competent, strong, sincere, and honest. And unlike Sarkozy, she does speak French!

    Ségolène Royal is intelligent and strong too, but she made several ridiculous mistakes. She has bad advisers.

    Unfortunately, Lionel Jospin (who I admire a lot) is not here anymore.
    Thus Martine Aubry is the ideal candidate.

    Best regards,

    Cem

  4. Thank Cem, I enjoy reading you.
    When I was a journalist in Bulgaria, five years ago and from a distance, I was made an error of judgment and thought Segolene Royal was a great candidate for the French left.
    Now that I see her on TV (and listen to her) much more often, I don’t think she’s credible. Her former husband Francois Hollande would be a much strong contender at the socialist primaries I guess.
    I think Martine Aubry could win those primaries. I know that you live in France and should know better, but I wouldn’t rule out a woman to become president in France. I have a lot of admiration for her father Jacques Delors.
    The bad scenario would be if Marine Le Pen would gather more support than the polls are indicating by now. The gender factor is not a handicap for her, apparently.
    Regarding DSK, I think that the French were lucky, somehow, that the scandal erupted before he became the president of his country. Sooner or later, he would have a similar scandal in a higher capacity. I think he needs medical treatment.
    By the way, if you sympathize with the French left, what do you think of CHP in Turkey? Do you see them as a centre-left party similar to the big socialist-socialdemocrat parties in EU countries?
    Cheers,
    Georgi

  5. Georgi,

    by the way, the picture at the top of Martin Vander Weyer’s article – from the Daily Telegraph – is excellent!

    I had a good laugh. I agree that the situation is not bright but now and then a good laugh is healthy.

    Best regards,

    Cem

  6. Dear Georgi,

    I never wanted to see Mr Strauss-Khan as the candidate of the socialists, but maybe that he is innocent.

    Ok he betrayed his wife many months ago, but that does not mean that he tried to rape a woman in an hotel. Well maybe that he wanted to sleep with her, but she refused. So maybe that woman didn’t tell everything.

    Because Mr Strauss-Kahn is not crazy, moreover he is intelligent.

    He knew that he would have problems if he dared try rape that employee of the hotel.

    By the way, if you sympathize with the French left, what do you think of CHP in Turkey? Do you see them as a centre-left party similar to the big socialist-socialdemocrat parties in EU countries?

    I look at the CHP as I look at the French socialist party.

    The CHP was unproductive for many years, and Mr Baykal caused a huge harm to the CHP (one of my uncle in Turkey agreed with me on that point). But thanks to Kemal Kiliçdaroglu – an intelligent man – the CHP can stand again. Mr Kilicdaroglu has made many mistakes (he also has bad advisers, unfortunately!), but I listened to his speech yesterday and he was excellent. His project is a socialist project.

    In my opinion, next june an AKP-CHP coalition would be very good for Turkey.

    Best regards,

    Cem

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