Reuniting Europe

I would give them the benefit of the doubt.

Maybe I will like them.

But it’s not love at first sight.

(This is my shortest blogpost so far. I also realise that it looks like a haiku…)

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  1. Good question; here is another: why should we mix politic and showbiz?
    Europe needs credible actors, who will gain popularity because of their deeds, not just because of their good looking face or presence in the press . Understandably, as this election was ‘professional’ only and thus required no public debate, it turns out that this logical result is not as easily digested/understood by the ‘grand public’.

  2. So, the “Germans” think that the choice was a plot against them while the “Poles” think it was a German plot to start with.

    The EU must be doing something right if those are the reactions. They show that the media and populations in the Member States still don’t understand the nature of the EU. Their unwillingness or inability to inform themselves is an embarrasement, but certainly not for the EU. An old adage comes to mind: If a book hits a head and it sounds hollow, it doesn’t have to be the book!

    Poles may be forgiven for their ignorance and stereotypical reaction, but Germany should ask herself some questions about EU-awareness after 50 years of membership (and where were the brilliant German candidates the public seems to be craving?).

    A final word on the commentary in the Wall Steet Journal: The EU will never find favours with any of Mr Murdoch’s outlets. His hate of the EU is only matched by the inability of Americans to grasp any degree of complexity. My apologies to the Yanks that we cannot make Europe easy enough for their mental abilities.

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